To Cure A Greater Evil

“I may be permitted, like the doctors, to cure a greater evil by a less, for I shall not fall seriously in love with the young widow, I think, nor she with me – that’s certain – but if I find a little pleasure in her society I may surely be allowed to seek it; and if the star of her divinity be bright enough to dim the lustre of Eliza’s, so much the better, but I scarcely can think it.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Distresses

“How odd it is that we so often weep for each other’s distresses, when we shed not a tear for our own!” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

At Times

“I flatter myself, at times, that though among them, I am not of them.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Merry, Simple-hearted Child

“In love affairs, there is no mediator like a merry, simple-hearted child – ever ready to cement divided hearts, to span the unfriendly gulf of custom, to melt the ice of cold reserve, and overthrow the separating walls of dread formality and pride.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Once With A Foolish

“I was infatuated once with a foolish, besotted affection, that clung to him in spite of his unworthiness, but it is fairly gone now–wholly crushed and withered away; and he has none but himself and his vices to thank for it.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Study My Pleasure

“If you would really study my pleasure, mother, you must consider your own comfort and convenience a little more than you do.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Rather Be Like Myself

“Well, to tell you the truth, I’ve thought of it often and often before, but he’s such devilish good company is Huntingdon, after all – you can’t imagine what a jovial good fellow he is when he’s not fairly drunk, only just primed or half-seas-over – we all have a bit of a liking for him at the bottom of our hearts, though we can’t respect him.’

‘But should you wish yourself to be like him?’

‘No, I’d rather be like myself, bad as I am.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Certain Graceful Ease

“There was a certain graceful ease and freedom about all he said and did, that gave a sense of repose and expansion to the mind, after so much constraint and formality as I had been doomed to suffer.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

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