Get Bronte-fied

Bronte Sisters

If you live in the Carmel, IN area, this will be of interest to you.

To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Emily Bronte’s birth, the Carmel Clay Public Library is hosting several events this summer.

July 19th – Get Brontë-fied!: Read the Book, See the Movie: Jane Eyre – 630PM – 830PM
July 27th – Get Brontë-fied!: Read the Book, Watch the Movie: Wuthering Heights – 630PM – 830PM
July 30th – Get Brontë-fied!: Celebrating Emily – 7PM – 8PM

The events will be held at the library’s main location. They are free and are open to the public. Visit the library’s website for more information.

The Emily Bronte Rose

Doesn’t this sound familiar? Last year I discovered there is a Jane Austen AND Pride and Prejudice rose varieties and it shouldn’t be too much of a surprise, truly it isn’t, to find out David Austin, fine breeders of English roses, has bred an Emily Bronte rose “delicious hints of lemon and grapefruit.” Now, I’m not a fan of roses, we once had an attack rose bush that loved pricking me whenever I walked by it, but I can get behind this fragrance.

An exceptionally beautiful rose; the distinctive blooms are very neat and rather flat. Each bloom is a lovely soft pink, with a subtle apricot hue, the smaller central petals deepening to rich apricot and surrounding a button eye, which unfurls to reveal deep-set stamens. The strong Tea fragrance becomes more Old Rose, with delicious hints of lemon and grapefruit. It forms a bushy shrub with strong, healthy, upright growth.

The roses are available to be shipped in the UK and Europe but unfortunately, they are not available in the US.

A Day Dream

Image of Emily Bronte

It would not be poetry month without posting poems from the Bronte sisters and Jane Austen! Every Thursday this month, I’ll post a new poem from one of our leading ladies.

A Day Dream
by Emily Bronte

On a sunny brae alone I lay
One summer afternoon;
It was the marriage-time of May
With her young lover, June.
From her Mother’s heart seemed loath to part
That queen of bridal charms,
But her Father smiled on the fairest child
He ever held in his arms.

The trees did wave their plumy crests,
The glad birds carolled clear;
And I, of all the wedding guests,
Was only sullen there.

There was not one but wished to shun
My aspect void of cheer;
The very grey rocks, looking on,
Asked, “What do you do here?”

And I could utter no reply:
In sooth I did not know
Why I had brought a clouded eye
To greet the general glow.

So, resting on a heathy bank,
I took my heart to me;
And we together sadly sank
Into a reverie.

We thought, “When winter comes again
Where will these bright things be?
All vanished, like a vision vain,
An unreal mockery!

“The birds that now so blithely sing,
Through deserts frozen dry,
Poor spectres of the perished Spring
In famished troops will fly.

“And why should we be glad at all?
The leaf is hardly green,
Before a token of the fall
Is on its surface seen.”

Now whether it were really so
I never could be sure-,
But as, in fit of peevish woe,
I stretched me on the moor,

A thousand thousand glancing fires
Seemed kindling in the air;
A thousand thousand silvery lyres
Resounded far and near:

Methought the very breath I breathed
Was full of sparks divine,
And all my heather-couch was wreathed
By that celestial shine.

And while the wide Earth echoing rang
To their strange minstrelsy,
The little glittering spirits sang,
Or seemed to sing, to me:

“0 mortal, mortal, let them die;
Let Time and Tears destroy,
That we may overflow the sky
With universal joy.

“Let Grief distract the sufferer’s breast,
And Night obscure his way;
They hasten him to endless rest,
And everlasting day.

“To Thee the world is like a tomb,
A desert’s naked shore;
To us, in unimagined bloom,
It brightens more and more.

“And could we lift the veil and give
One brief glimpse to thine eye
Thou would’st rejoice for those that live,
Because they live to die.”

The music ceased-the noonday Dream
Like dream of night withdrew
But Fancy still will sometimes deem
Her fond creation true.

Happy anniversary to Wuthering Heights and Anges Grey!

Bronte Sisters

Wuthering Heights

I am remiss to say I missed the 170th (December 14th) anniversary of the publications, jointly, of Wuthering Heights and Anges Grey.

Anges Grey

The novels, written by Emily Brontë as Ellis Bell, and Anne Brontë, writing as Acton Bell, have remained steadfast in their popularity for nearly two centuries.

I confess I haven’t read either in a long time—remember when earlier this year I said I was going to re-read Austen’s works and never got beyond the first three chapters of Mansfield Park? Yeah, that.—and one of these days I will rectify that but until then, I raise a glass of hot tea to two ladies who broke molds and remained true to themselves.