Distresses

“How odd it is that we so often weep for each other’s distresses, when we shed not a tear for our own!” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Merry, Simple-hearted Child

“In love affairs, there is no mediator like a merry, simple-hearted child – ever ready to cement divided hearts, to span the unfriendly gulf of custom, to melt the ice of cold reserve, and overthrow the separating walls of dread formality and pride.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Such Baubles

“She spoke of these with animation, and heard my admiring comments with a smile of pleasure: that soon, however, vanished, and was followed by a melancholy sigh; as if in consideration of the insufficiency of all such baubles to the happiness of the human heart, and their woeful inability to supply its insatiate demands.” Anges Grey by Anne Bronte

Long Oppressed

“When we are harassed by sorrows or anxieties, or long oppressed by any powerful feelings which we must keep to ourselves, for which we can obtain and seek no sympathy from any living creature, and which yet we cannot, or will not wholly crush, we often naturally seek relief in poetry— and often find it, too— whether in the effusions of others, which seem to harmonize with our existing case, or in our own attempts to give utterance to those thoughts and feelings in strains less musical, perchance, but more appropriate, and therefore more penetrating and sympathetic, and, for the time, more soothing, or more powerful to rouse and to unburden the oppressed and swollen heart.” Anges Grey by Anne Bronte

Slight Tightening

“When we had surmounted the acclivity, I was about to withdraw my arm from his, but by a slight tightening of the elbow was tacitly informed that such was not his will, and accordingly desisted.” Anges Grey by Anne Bronte

Encourage By Laughing

“Whatever was wrong, in either her or her brother, he would encourage by laughing at, if not by actually praising: people little know the injury they do to children by laughing at their faults, and making a pleasant jest of what their true friends have endeavoured to teach them to hold in grave abhorrence.”   Anges Grey by Anne Bronte

Cherish His Image

“But still, I would think of him: I would cherish his image in my mind; and treasure every word, look, and gesture that my memory could retain; and brood over his excellences and his peculiarities, and, in fact, all I had seen, heard, or imagined respecting him.” Anges Grey by Anne Bronte

Once With A Foolish

“I was infatuated once with a foolish, besotted affection, that clung to him in spite of his unworthiness, but it is fairly gone now–wholly crushed and withered away; and he has none but himself and his vices to thank for it.” The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte