Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters links for January 15, 2017

Image for Austentatious Links

Here are your Jane Austen and Bronte sisters related links for the week:

Jane Austen Festival in Louisville – July 14, 15, 16 2017

Jane Austen Louisville Festival

As some of you may know, I live in the greater Louisville, KY region and one of the first things I did when I moved here was to change my membership region to Louisville AND to volunteer for the yearly Festival (North America’s largest JA festival!). This festival has been on my radar for years but either time or location has prevented me from attending but now that I live here, I can not only go but I am also volunteering which I’m super excited for.

Today was my first planning meeting (they started in December) and it was intense. I knew planning a festival was heavy duty having worked several in the past but an entire festival to honor a singular person is fierce. I thought I was a huge Austen devotee but the planning committee made my love look as if I was merely glancing at the novels on occasion.

And this is not a bad thing since you know, Jane is everywhere.

I’ve volunteered for sub-committee to handle social media / blogging and it looks like I’ll be co-librarianing the chapter’s media collection. Tomorrow (January 15) is the monthly general chapter meeting which means I’ll have an entire weekend of Jane which is a splendid weekend indeed.

(I also plugged my blog at the meeting so hello!)

For more information, check the festival’s website or their Facebook page for updates and information on ticket costs, workshops, and the ball!  See you there!

See you there!

Introducing the Daily Jane Austen & Bronte Quote mailing list

Reader, I am terribly excited to tell you about my new endeavor! Starting today the Daily Austen & Bronte Quote mailing list goes live. What is it exactly? Every day, for a year!, you’ll get a new Austen or Bronte quote in your inbox. Yes, this sounds fairly ambitious but the more I dug into looking for quotes, the more I found so getting a new quote from any of the authors for a year is not going to be a problem.

Anywho, sign up! Sign up! Sign up below or in the sidebar to your right!

xxoo

(P.S. email me or use the contact form if anything goes awry.)


Subscribe to the Daily Austen & Bronte Quotes!



The Lady’s Choice: A New Regency Era Visual Novel

The Lady's Choice

Oooohhh…this looks fun!

A choose your own adventure type game, The Lady’s Choice is a “light visual novel” set in the Regency era that places the player as a lady of good standing coming back into society. Your quest is to navigate your new (and upcoming) social standings though not strictly for marriage. According to the developers, “The goal is to give the feel of a regency romance novel, but an interactive one!”

(They also caution the game is not wholly historically accurate due to liberties for the sake of the plots so please stop clutching pearls by rushing emails off to correct inaccuracies.)

The game is currently available for Windows / OSX / Linux users and while the game is free, there is an option to pay what you think the game is worth as well as tipping the developers.

(I’ve downloaded the game and will report back!)


(H/T Kotaku)

Jane Austen: The BBC Radio Drama Collection

Jane Austen radio collection

Hol. Lee. Cats.

According to Amazon US, in September 2016 the BBC released a 14-hour compilation of Jane’s published novels in dramatized audio format. While the release in the US is fairly new, the series was originally broadcasted on the BBC, starting in 2003, with rather unknowns Benedict Cumberbatch and David Tennant.

Additional actors include Julia McKenzie, Jenny Agutter, Toby Jones, Eve Best, and Juliet Stevenson.

(I’m also convinced James McAvoy plays Henry Crawford in Mansfield Park but I cannot find verification or a complete cast list.)

You can pick up the collection at Amazon either as CDs or in Audible. (If you do not have an Audible account, you can get the collection for $14.95 when you sign up. Be forwarned that the price is for a per month membership but you can cancel anytime and you get to keep your library.)

#rainjane

#rainjane

The city of Winchester, UK is celebrating Jane’s 200th death anniversary this summer by placing 12 of Jane’s quotes around the city centre which can only be viewed when it rains. The final quote, “Know your own happiness. Call it hope.”, is located on a bench across the house where Jane died,

For more information on the walk, visit the city of Winchester’s site which also provides additional events to celebrate this year.

Additionally, you can track event by  #rainjane across social media.

(P.S. Since it seems to rain in England 24/7/365, following the trail shouldn’t be that hard. 😉 )

Will + Jane

Folger Shakespeare Library is currently running an online exhibit, Will + Jane, comparing (and contrasting!) the works of Shakespeare and Austen through the ages. Lots of interesting stuff going on over there.

Some highlights:

Enjoy!

 

The Familiarity of Reality Stars as Jane Austen Characters

Kardash sisters as Austen characters

This Atlantic piece  by Sophie Gilbert was published in May 2016 but it’s new to me. I found the piece provocative — paralleling reality stars with Austen heroines? Are they mad?

Gilbert’s thesis, “Why do reality television’s most popular stars so uncannily resemble the heroines of the 19th-century writer’s work?”, upon further thought which gave way to slow nodding of my head. “Of geeze,” I thought. “Were we always so blind to not think Austen’s characters were sketched from similiar people like the Kardashs?”  And it wouldn’t be that much of a stretch to compare them to the Bennet sisters: there is always a good girl (Kourtney), a headstrong girl (Khole), a social climber (Kim), and attention queens (Kylie and Kendall). Even Kris (their mother) has parallel ties with Mrs. Bennet.

From Gilbert,

But what’s clear reading Austen today, or watching one of the countless adaptations of her work, is how much the women in her novels have in common with so many of the women on reality television.

Holy cat’s pyjamas. I’m both amused and a titch recoiled comparing trashy reality stars to the loveliness of Jane’s world. (Work with me here — I know not all of Jane’s heroines lived in splendor and good graces, but for the sake of this argument, they are positively queens.)

Gilbert also ties Blac Chyna, Rob Kardashian’s baby momma, to Lady Susan which is also an uncanny parallel.

Gilbert goes on,

Isn’t it weird? It’s possible to imagine Austen, reincarnated with her bonnet and penchant for millinery, being moderately overwhelmed by the various cuts and colors of synthetic fabric worn by the contestants on The Bachelor. But the show’s premise would strike her as utterly familiar.

I wonder how Austen would feel reading these words — would she agree the roles of women in society and in the home have not changed (much) in over 200+ years since her books were published? Would she smirk, I believe Jane would be a smirker, at the silliness, though entertaining as they may be, of these shows?

This is why Gilbert’s, in my not so humble opinion, comparisons are not that far fetched. And when you think about the piece in that context, no matter how much Jane may have smirked at the idea, in the end she would, unfortunately, agree.

Let us have Jane have the final word:

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn? 

Mediations on Anne Bronte

Bronte Sisters

I haven’t had a chance to watch To Walk Invisible yet, the BBC bio-drama that aired last week on the Brontës, but to satiate viewers for knowledge for more Brontë, The Guardian recently published a piece on Anne Brontë, the younger and lesser known sister of the family, on her body of work. The piece centers mostly on Anges Grey, Anne’s first book, a tale of a woman who is too educated to be a servant and too poor to be a lady which falls to her only option: becoming a governess.

Anges Grey is a sharp-witted observational tale of a governess who speaks directly to the reader and due to its frankness of the reality of the governess jobs these genteel women take, the book was set to cause an outrage when it was published. Except, dear reader, if you may remember, Jane Eyre (by sister Charlotte), does exactly what Anges Grey was supposed to do and Anges Grey has long been considered Jane Eyre’s poorer imitation. Except, Anges Grey was written first and scholars argue it was Anne who should have gotten the accolades first, not Charlotte.

The Guardian piece, which parallels Anne’s life with Anges’, is written by Samantha Ellis whose forthcoming book, Take Courage: Anne Bronte and the Art of Life, is set to be released internationally this spring with no known US publishing date. 

 

 

At Home With Jane Austen by Lucy Worsley

At Home with Jane Austen

Holy cat’s pyjamas! One of my favourite historians is releasing a book on Jane this summer to coincide with the 200th anniversary of her death. (Pour one out for Jane’s death, amen.)

From the publisher,

On the eve of the two hundredth anniversary of Jane Austen’s death, take a trip back to her world and the many places she lived as historian Lucy Worsley visits Austen’s childhood home, her schools, her holiday accommodations, the houses – both grand and small – of the relations upon whom she was dependent, and the home she shared with her mother and sister towards the end of her life.

[…]

Worsley examines the rooms, spaces and possessions which mattered to her, and the varying ways in which homes are used in her novels as both places of pleasure and as prisons. She shows readers a passionate Jane Austen who fought for her freedom, a woman who had at least five marriage prospects, but – in the end – a woman who refused to settle for anything less than Mr. Darcy.

The book is set to release in the US on July 11, 2017 with simultaneous publication in the UK. I should have a review up a few days after that.