Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters links for March 11, 2018

Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters links header

Here are your Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters related links for the week:

Pride and Passion: Jane Austen in Telenovela Form

Still image from Pride and Passions

According to Willow and Thatch, the Brazillian network Globo is set to broadcast a combination of Jane Austen’s novels (all six novels and Lady Susaninto a single soapy serial, Pride and Passion (Orgulho e Paixã), starting March 20th. The serial will air six episodes a week for a total of 150 episodes. In addition to merging all of Austen’s work into a single telenovela, the time period shifts from the Regency era to early 1900s.

This looks pretty awesome.

For an extensive look at the upcoming telenovela, and to find out more information on how to watch the show outside of Brazil, make sure to head over Willow and Thatch. DO also check out the 8 minute preview below. Don’t forget to make sure you turn English subtitles on which, I will warn you, does a word by word translation so the sentences may not always make sense. While Pride and Passion (Orgulho e Paixão) could qualify as a dramedy, the mistakes in translation make it slightly more hilarious.

I also wanted to mention my discovery of this new (to me) site, Willow and Thatch. I’m always on the lookout not only for blogs that match my interests but well written and consistently updated (it is surprising to me how many do not fit either criterion). A million and a half years ago, I ran a project called Put A Cravat On It, which was a fairly, at the time, extensive listing of period television series. While my project has not been updated since December of 2015, Willow and Thatch seem to pick up where I left off by not only including movies with television series but breaking them down by the period. So if you have a hankering for Regency film or something set in the Tudor era, they have you covered.

(I do have a  few small quibbles in that they link directly to Amazon in their movies and I could not find the links for streaming sites though they mention in the intros that some of the shows/movies are available to stream. I can infer the linking to Amazon is to support their site, which yay for them, AND hunting down the links to all the streaming services can be a pain, I get that, I’ve been there, but with a world where we are always streaming content, not having access to those links seem a bit off. My second quibble is they list “best of” rather than making a comprehensive list. Yes, I know, that’s a lot of work but “best of” is always a matter of particular opinion.)

Jane Austen and Brontë links for March 4, 2018

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Here are your Jane Austen and Brontë links for the week:

A Singular Couple part four

(Ed.- I am beyond pleased to present the serial of the story A Singular Couple written by A Lady™.  Jane meets the Angelus’ while in Bath and well, their friendship goes in a direction most unexpected. If you’re a fan of Buffy, The Vampire Slayer, well, you can only guess where this goes. Check in every Thursday for a new chapter!)

Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four

July 17, 1817 –

My Dearest Cassandra,

I hope this little note will cheer you, and give rest to your fears of leaving me in the care of Mrs. Angelus. I know you find her conversation alarming, but I fear less for the morals of a woman who talks openly than those who always say the correct things. I feel we have seen the worst of her, and that is refreshing. If her husband proved himself to be an incorrigible rake, well, the wife of such a man is to be pitied, not scorned. Furthermore, Mr. A is assuredly absent. Darla promises me he is many days sea voyage away on some sort of educational journey.

Do forgive me for sending you away! All will be better when you return in two weeks. Mrs. A will depart then for London, there to await her husband’s return, and I will be very much in better health, I am sure of it. Mrs. A has told me she knows of a particular cure for my ailment, and will apply it tonight: I have only to take a turn with her in the damnable invalid chair while the moon is out. (I suspect this is more to distract me than for any medicinal affect. You see how you and Darla could be such friends? You both are terrible liars.)

Please think only pleasant thoughts of me, my dearest sister, and I look forward to reading to you from my work when you return. I’m basing a character on dear M. Angelus and you will get great satisfaction from hating her.

Yours Affectionately,


July 23, 1817
Address Unknown

Dearest Cassandra,

I am aware that a funeral was held for me and a body buried and this letter will come to you as a great shock, but I am alive. Alive and well! Know that, be content and glad, and do not try to find me. I shall come to you when I am ready.

Please see to it that all correspondence I have sent mentioning Mr. or Mrs. Angelus are destroyed. This would be a great service to me. I trust you with handling my other papers and my silly books. Treat all I left behind as if I have truly died, or I should say, continue to do so. I hope you gave Fanny the springed muslin and all the fruits and laces for my bonnets, save any you wish to keep for yourself.

You would blush to see what Darla has put me in today! A canary gown all ruffles and lace that would befit a maiden in the first blush of youth! I confess, it feels natural. I have thrown off my high collars and can breathe.

Colors are bolder now I am well. The air tastes… it tastes so elaborately. I am possessed of a demonic energy. I could run for days and write forever.

On that front, I confess I have composed but a few short vignettes since my recovery and I am mildly concerned at the dark direction my fancy takes. I may have grown as uncensored as Darla herself. I have continued the fancy I had to make her a character and may base a whole book around her. I…

Perhaps you should burn my notes from early July, and this letter, too. Yes. Tell no one. This shall all be our little secret. Darla and I are to quit the country tonight and I dare not tell you where we go. When my path takes me back to England, I shall find you, dear sister. I will kiss you so deeply on your sweet, swan-like neck, as I kiss my patroness now.

Yours Eternally,

The End